Exercise, Trigger Points, and Muscle Pain

Muscles control all movement. Every finger movement to eye blink to cough to toe wiggle to getting up from a chair to getting out of a car to, well, you name the movement, is controlled by muscle.

And usually tens to hundreds of muscles to control even the smallest of movements.

Every movement consists of thousands to millions of neurons firing all throughout the brain and the spine and the central nervous system to the peripheral nervous system, controlling hundreds of muscles that are contracting and relaxing to allow the movement, akin to a symphony of firings throughout the nervous system.

All of this just to control scratching your nose. Continue reading Exercise, Trigger Points, and Muscle Pain

Trigger Points, Exercise, and Joint Health

 

Everyone has muscles. Every second that you breathe, you use your muscles.

Anything that moves in your body is moved by muscles. When you breathe, your diaphragm and intercostal muscles relax to allow extra space in your torso for the air that fills your lungs. These same muscles contract to push the air out of your lungs.

You don’t have to think about moving these muscles because they are controlled by your autonomic nervous system. This is the opposite of the muscles that you control.

These are just some of the muscles that you use without thinking about them. The gluteal muscles in your hips and pelvis are contracting and relaxing constantly to keep you sitting and walking upright.

Since you use these muscles so much without even thinking about it, they can get injured easily. Continue reading Trigger Points, Exercise, and Joint Health

Exercise and Brain Health part 3

Exercise is an amazing thing. Studies keep coming out that discover new ways that exercise benefits our bodies, and more recently, our minds.

Exercise will keep our brain healthy. Exercise will improve brain function. Exercise increases blood flow to the brain, which results in more oxygen to the brain. Increased oxygen to the brain perks you up and increases alertness. The main purpose of yawning is to increase oxygen in the brain. Continue reading Exercise and Brain Health part 3

How to Treat and Prevent Muscle Injuries

muscular body

Most people will stop a new exercise routine due to injury. I read somewhere once that 90% of all people who start up a new exercise routine will have to stop due to injury.

Once injured, it can take 2 weeks to years on end to heal. Depending on how bad the injury was, how old you are, how much wear and tear you have on your body, how healthy you are, what type of shape you are in, how well you eat, and how much you are sleeping can affect how quickly you heal from an injury. Continue reading How to Treat and Prevent Muscle Injuries